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six hours. the virus attaches itself to the t4 cell-- the cell that regulates the body's defense system-- and destroys it. in so doing, it's destroying all of your ability to mount a defense against any other germ that might come along or any cancer cell that might come along. but that's not all. because h.i.v. is a retro virus, it can also insert its genetic material into selected t4 cells. alexandra levine: and as long as that t4 cell lives, the virus is living also inside of it. we used to think that if we can just keep the virus hidden in the dna there, then eventually those t4 cells will die out and we might be able to cure this. but it turns out that those long-lived "latently infected" t4 cells in which the virus is there, hidden in the dna, they may live 20 or 30 years, and therefore, the ability to really cure this infection may not be possible. ronald mitsuyasu: so it's a very insidious virus that attacks human immune cells, integrates within the cell itself, and then replicates within those cells and then goes on to attack additional immune cells. and the terrifying th
england's greatest art critic, disagreed and wrote a passionate defense. (ruskin) "many-colored mists are floating above the distant city, but such mists as you might imagine to be ethereal spirit in this picture ought to be viewed as embodied enchantment, delineated magic." (narrator) at home in england, turner continued to enjoy the patronage of the aristocracy. at petworth house in sussex, lord egremont, a curious mixture of rake and intellectual, opened his collection of sculpture and paintings to visiting artists who could come and go as they pleased. he provided turner with a studio. lord egremont commissioned several paintings from turner, including petworth lake. a study for a larger painting, it reveals how turner's use of oils gained from the experimental work he was undertaking in watercolors during the 1820s. turner planned images by laying down broad areas of primary color to denote forms he sought to represent. his persistent use of yellow caught the reviewers' eyes. one hostile critic suggested that he suffered from yellow fever. another compared him to a cook with a ma
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